3 Twitter lessons you must learn from the Oscars

by Katerina Petropoulou, posted 4 months ago
Join 500,000+ users and check your own Twitter Stats for Free! Sign up now!

This year’s Oscars will be memorable for many different reasons. For example, for the most epic selfie in the history of Twitter or for poor Leo not winning the Oscar. Again!

More than this, the Oscars can definitely teach some very important lessons about tweaking your Twitter performance. Let’s take a look!

Small mistakes can be magnified

John Travolta

As weird as it may sound, try to see John Travolta as your Twitter account. John made an honest mistake pronouncing someone’s name. Now, mistakes (on Twitter, as well) can happen. After all, they show that there’s an actual human being behind the handle and not a Twitter bot. So no big deal! Yet on social media, more often than ever, even the tiniest mistakes are magnified. And as you can imagine, the bigger the mistake, the bigger the deal.

What’s the takeaway lesson here? Be accurate and consistent on what you tweet. Always double check your content and don’t be afraid to admit it when you’re wrong.

What would Benedict do?

Benedict Cumberbatch

Another glorious Oscar moment: Benedict Cumberbatch photobombing U2 and basically stealing their thunder.

Benedict unintentionally taught us an important Twitter lesson: Be present. Make the most out of events unfolding in real time to increase your Twitter engagement, your brand awareness and potential conversions. Especially if these events are related to your brand.

Unfortunately, Samsung did not really take in Benedict’s lesson. During the show, Samsung had a product placement that many would envy. But they failed to follow through on Twitter. Although Samsung’s US Twitter handle did tweet Ellen’s selfie, they barely tweeted anything related to the Oscars. There goes a missed opportunity for Twitter engagement and conversions Samsung!

However, keep in mind that going too far “twitter bombing” every single event is certainly a bad idea. Take for example Kenneth Cole’s infamous tweet that used the possible military action in Syria to promote footware and of course lead to immediate outrage.


Give your audience what it needs

When Ellen handed out pizza to the front row at the Oscars, I’m sure a lot of the celebrities were relieved. A little snack during a 3 hour event is always welcomed, right?

What Ellen did, was simply give her audience what it needed. And that’s a great lesson for your Twitter performance. Giving your audience valuable content they would enjoy and possibly share is the first ingredient to higher Twitter engagement. Thank you Ellen!

Bonus lesson: Ellen-approved [insert product]

The pizza Ellen handed out at the Oscars came from a local business. And that’s some stellar celebrity endorsement. But it’s probably hard to get an A-list celebrity endorse your product, service or new blog post. Trust us, we’ve tried! But celebrity doesn’t always mean a movie star. Getting the attention of the “celebrities” in your field and building trust with them on Twitter, can help you increase your account’s own influence, credibility, follower growth and of course engagement.

So tell us! What did you learn from the Oscars that could help you out on Twitter? Leave us a comment below or tweet you learnings @thecounter

Comments

  • http://themarketshotdoctrine.com/ MarketShot

    Great post, this reminded me of the Oreo ad during the Super Bowl two years ago. The quick and witty companies (or their marketing teams) can leave an impact for years with one well timed tweet.

  • http://twittercounter.com/blog/ Katerina Petropoulou

    This is true! In fact Oreo is doing a great job on Twitter. We briefly discussed it in a previous post here: http://twittercounter.com/blog/2014/02/top-7-things-successful-brands-do-on-twitter/. But we’ll definitely come back with a case study on Oreo’s Twitter performance and some tips that everyone can use in their tweeting.

  • Vinicius Porto

    FYI: just as Ellen did, John did not make a mistake spelling the name incorrectly.That was the purpose.